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Preparatory Division String Camp, June 20-24, Ages 6-9 and 9-12. Registration deadline is May 20th. Preparatory Division, Tanner Dance and Youth Theatre Arts Passport, June 27 - July 1, Create an original performance work to be presented at the Tanner Dance Building. Preparatory Division International Piano Festival, July 26 - July 29, Musicianship, ukulele, and choir classes. University of Utah, School of Music.

Home in Their Eyes: Images and Stories of Home by Residents in Rural China, Friday, March 25 – Thursday, June 2, 2016, J. Willard Marriott Library 3rd Floor

Salt Dance Fest 2016 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Jeanine Durning, Alex Ketley and Jennifer Nugent, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Daniel Charon, Molly Heller and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 6-17, 2016.

Summer Chamber Music Workshop, Matt Zalkind, June 26 - 30, 2016, Hasse Borup, Director, Open for serious string and piano players, age 12 - 26,  School of Music, University of Utah

University of Utah Department of Ballet Summer Intensive, June 20 - July 15, 2016. Join us for an exciting four-week ballet intensive with internationally recognized faculty and guest artists.

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Ballet, University of Utah

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah 2015 Lecture Series

College of Fine Arts, University of Utah

Visualization of Merging Black Holes and Gravitational Waves

This visualization shows gravitational waves emitted by two black holes of nearly equal mass as they spiral together and merge. Orange ripples represent distortions of space-time caused by the rapidly orbiting masses. These distortions spread out and weaken, ultimately becoming gravitational waves (purple). Black spheres represent the black hole event horizons, surfaces beyond which nothing can escape. The merger timescale depends on the masses of the black holes. 

For a system containing black holes with about 30 times the sun’s mass, similar to the one detected by LIGO in 2015, the orbital period at the start of the movie is just 65 milliseconds, with the black holes moving at about one-tenth the speed of light. Space-time distortions radiate away orbital energy and cause the binary to contract quickly. As the two black holes near each other, a new horizon forms around them, creating a single merged black hole that quickly settles into its "ringdown" phase and emits its final gravitational waves. For the 2015 LIGO detection, these events played out in little more than a quarter of a second. This simulation was performed on the Pleiades supercomputer at NASA's Ames Research Center.

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