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Preparatory Division String Camp, June 20-24, Ages 6-9 and 9-12. Registration deadline is May 20th. Preparatory Division, Tanner Dance and Youth Theatre Arts Passport, June 27 - July 1, Create an original performance work to be presented at the Tanner Dance Building. Preparatory Division International Piano Festival, July 26 - July 29, Musicianship, ukulele, and choir classes. University of Utah, School of Music.

Home in Their Eyes: Images and Stories of Home by Residents in Rural China, Friday, March 25 – Thursday, June 2, 2016, J. Willard Marriott Library 3rd Floor

Salt Dance Fest 2016 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Jeanine Durning, Alex Ketley and Jennifer Nugent, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Daniel Charon, Molly Heller and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 6-17, 2016.

Summer Chamber Music Workshop, Matt Zalkind, June 26 - 30, 2016, Hasse Borup, Director, Open for serious string and piano players, age 12 - 26,  School of Music, University of Utah

University of Utah Department of Ballet Summer Intensive, June 20 - July 15, 2016. Join us for an exciting four-week ballet intensive with internationally recognized faculty and guest artists.

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Ballet, University of Utah

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah 2015 Lecture Series

College of Fine Arts, University of Utah

World's Largest Canyon Could Be Hidden under Antarctic Ice Sheet

The world's largest canyon may lie beneath the Antarctic ice sheet, according to an analysis of new satellite data.

The previously unknown canyon is thought to be over 1,000 kilometres long and in places as much as a kilometre deep, which would make it comparable in depth to the Grand Canyon in United States, but many times longer.

Scientists are hoping to confirm the discovery by taking direct measurements of the canyon through the icy surface of Antarctica. The initial findings are published this month in the journal Geology, by researchers from Durham and Newcastle Universities, Imperial College London, and international collaborators.

The canyon system is believed to be made up of a chain of winding and linear features buried under several kilometres of ice in one of the last unexplored regions of the Earth’s land surface: Princess Elizabeth Land (PEL) in East Antarctica.

Very few measurements of the ice thickness have been carried out in this particular area of the Antarctic, which has led to scientists dubbing it one of Antarctica’s two ‘Poles of Ignorance’.

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