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Preparatory Division String Camp, June 20-24, Ages 6-9 and 9-12. Registration deadline is May 20th. Preparatory Division, Tanner Dance and Youth Theatre Arts Passport, June 27 - July 1, Create an original performance work to be presented at the Tanner Dance Building. Preparatory Division International Piano Festival, July 26 - July 29, Musicianship, ukulele, and choir classes. University of Utah, School of Music.

Home in Their Eyes: Images and Stories of Home by Residents in Rural China, Friday, March 25 – Thursday, June 2, 2016, J. Willard Marriott Library 3rd Floor

Salt Dance Fest 2016 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Jeanine Durning, Alex Ketley and Jennifer Nugent, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Daniel Charon, Molly Heller and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 6-17, 2016.

Summer Chamber Music Workshop, Matt Zalkind, June 26 - 30, 2016, Hasse Borup, Director, Open for serious string and piano players, age 12 - 26,  School of Music, University of Utah

University of Utah Department of Ballet Summer Intensive, June 20 - July 15, 2016. Join us for an exciting four-week ballet intensive with internationally recognized faculty and guest artists.

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Ballet, University of Utah

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah 2015 Lecture Series

College of Fine Arts, University of Utah

Scientists Shrink Ants To Study Mechanisms That Control DNA Expression

In the pages of Marvel comic books, Ant-Man manipulates fictional subatomic particles in order to shrink and fight crime as one of Earth's mightiest heroes.

In real life, a team of biologists has now achieved similar shrinking results by manipulating ants' DNA. The work won't produce any superpowers, but it presents a useful model for understanding how environmental factors can influence DNA expression to create a range of outcomes in a population.

The work is published online in the journal Nature Communications. Sebastian Alvarado, a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford, conducted the research as a graduate student at McGill University, working alongside fellow graduate student Rajendhran Rajakumar, and professors Ehab Abouheif and Moshe Szyf, all of McGill.

The experiment was designed as a means to study variation in quantitative traits. These are individual qualities, such as height or body weight, that can naturally vary across a defined range in a population. This variation is usually driven by the degree that environmental or other factors influence the expression of a particular gene, which makes ants an excellent test model.

For details of this discovery, please visit the website of Stanford University.

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