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Preparatory Division String Camp, June 20-24, Ages 6-9 and 9-12. Registration deadline is May 20th. Preparatory Division, Tanner Dance and Youth Theatre Arts Passport, June 27 - July 1, Create an original performance work to be presented at the Tanner Dance Building. Preparatory Division International Piano Festival, July 26 - July 29, Musicianship, ukulele, and choir classes. University of Utah, School of Music.

Home in Their Eyes: Images and Stories of Home by Residents in Rural China, Friday, March 25 – Thursday, June 2, 2016, J. Willard Marriott Library 3rd Floor

Salt Dance Fest 2016 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Jeanine Durning, Alex Ketley and Jennifer Nugent, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Daniel Charon, Molly Heller and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 6-17, 2016.

Summer Chamber Music Workshop, Matt Zalkind, June 26 - 30, 2016, Hasse Borup, Director, Open for serious string and piano players, age 12 - 26,  School of Music, University of Utah

University of Utah Department of Ballet Summer Intensive, June 20 - July 15, 2016. Join us for an exciting four-week ballet intensive with internationally recognized faculty and guest artists.

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Ballet, University of Utah

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah 2015 Lecture Series

College of Fine Arts, University of Utah

OSU Researchers Discover the Unicorn – Seaweed That Tastes Like Bacon!

NEWPORT, Ore. – Oregon State University researchers have patented a new strain of a succulent red marine algae called dulse that grows extraordinarily quickly, is packed full of protein and has an unusual trait when it is cooked.

This seaweed tastes like bacon.

Dulse (Palmaria sp.) grows in the wild along the Pacific and Atlantic coastlines. It is harvested and usually sold for up to $90 a pound in dried form as a cooking ingredient or nutritional supplement. But researcher Chris Langdon and colleagues at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center have created and patented a new strain of dulse – one he has been growing for the past 15 years.

This strain, which looks like translucent red lettuce, is an excellent source of minerals, vitamins and antioxidants – and it contains up to 16 percent protein in dry weight, Langdon said.

“The original goal was to create a super-food for abalone, because high-quality abalone is treasured, especially in Asia,” Langdon pointed out. “We were able to grow dulse-fed abalone at rates that exceeded those previously reported in the literature. There always has been an interest in growing dulse for human consumption, but we originally focused on using dulse as a food for abalone.”

For details, please visit the website of Oregon State University.

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