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Preparatory Division String Camp, June 20-24, Ages 6-9 and 9-12. Registration deadline is May 20th. Preparatory Division, Tanner Dance and Youth Theatre Arts Passport, June 27 - July 1, Create an original performance work to be presented at the Tanner Dance Building. Preparatory Division International Piano Festival, July 26 - July 29, Musicianship, ukulele, and choir classes. University of Utah, School of Music.

Home in Their Eyes: Images and Stories of Home by Residents in Rural China, Friday, March 25 – Thursday, June 2, 2016, J. Willard Marriott Library 3rd Floor

Salt Dance Fest 2016 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Jeanine Durning, Alex Ketley and Jennifer Nugent, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Daniel Charon, Molly Heller and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 6-17, 2016.

Summer Chamber Music Workshop, Matt Zalkind, June 26 - 30, 2016, Hasse Borup, Director, Open for serious string and piano players, age 12 - 26,  School of Music, University of Utah

University of Utah Department of Ballet Summer Intensive, June 20 - July 15, 2016. Join us for an exciting four-week ballet intensive with internationally recognized faculty and guest artists.

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Ballet, University of Utah

Performance Calendar of 2015 - 2016 Season, Department of Modern Dance, University of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah 2015 Lecture Series

College of Fine Arts, University of Utah

Einstein Is Wrong: Quantum Entanglement Experiment Shows the Universe is "Spooky"

In a landmark study, scientists at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands reported that they had conducted an experiment that they say proved one of the most fundamental claims of quantum theory — that objects separated by great distance can instantaneously affect each other’s behavior.

The finding is another blow to one of the bedrock principles of standard physics known as “locality,” which states that an object is directly influenced only by its immediate surroundings. The Delft study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, lends further credence to an idea that Einstein famously rejected. He said quantum theory necessitated “spooky action at a distance,” and he refused to accept the notion that the universe could behave in such a strange and apparently random fashion.

The Delft researchers were able to entangle two electrons separated by a distance of 1.3 kilometers, slightly less than a mile, and then share information between them. Physicists use the term “entanglement” to refer to pairs of particles that are generated in such a way that they cannot be described independently. The scientists placed two diamonds on opposite sides of the Delft University campus, 1.3 kilometers apart.

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